'Sting' Protein's Efforts to Clean Up Brain Cell Damage May Speed Parkinson's Disease Progress

'Sting' Protein's Efforts to Clean Up Brain Cell Damage May Speed Parkinson's Disease Progress

Published: 5/9/2022 The immune system's response to cell damage may accelerate the progress of PD. Researchers have identified STING (stimulator of interferon genes) as a potential target to stop the inflammatory response that may be disrupting brain cell signal balance, leading to the worsening of Parkinson's disease.

Integrative genome-wide analysis of dopaminergic neuron-specific PARIS expression in Drosophila diss

Integrative genome-wide analysis of dopaminergic neuron-specific PARIS expression in Drosophila diss

Published: 11/02/21 Integrative genome-wide analysis of dopaminergic neuron-specific PARIS expression in Drosophila dissects recognition of multiple PPARγ associated gene regulation

PARIS farnesylation prevents neurodegeneration in models of Parkinson’s disease

PARIS farnesylation prevents neurodegeneration in models of Parkinson’s disease

Published: 07/19/21 PARIS farnesylation prevents neurodegeneration in models of Parkinson's disease

Parkinson Disease: Translating Insights from Molecular Mechanisms to Neuroprotection

Parkinson Disease: Translating Insights from Molecular Mechanisms to Neuroprotection

Published: 10/18/21 Parkinson Disease: Translating Insights from Molecular Mechanisms to Neuroprotection

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WELCOME TO THE DAWSON LAB

We are part of the Institute for Cell Engineering, the Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, and the Morris K. Udall Parkinson’s Disease Research Center of Excellence at Johns Hopkins University. Our research is focused on the molecular basis for neurodegeneration, neuronal cell death, and survival.   

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS

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TED M. DAWSON

My laboratory uses genetic, cell biological and biochemical approaches to explore the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other neurologic disorders.  We also investigate several discrete mechanisms involved in cell death including the role of nitric oxide as an endogenous messenger, the function of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and apoptosis inducing factor in cell death, and how endogenous cell survival mechanisms protect neurons from death. 

The brain is the most complex organ in the body and allows us to interact with the world around us. When neurons are lost due to trauma or disease there is a significant loss of function.  In order to treat patients suffering neurologic dysfunction it will be necessary to accomplish several integrated goals including: (1) understanding the cellular death signaling pathways to reveal potential targets for pharmaceutical intervention, (2) understanding endogenous survival pathways to learn how to induce them to provide complimentary or alternative therapeutic targets, (3) to learn how nerves regenerate and find their appropriate targets, (4) to restore full function it may be necessary to replace the neurons that have been lost.

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VALINA L. DAWSON

GUT-BRAIN CONNECTION IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

Animation created by Susie Yun, MA through collaboration with Drs. Ted and Valina Dawson. Thesis project completed in fulfillment of the Master of Arts in Medical & Biological Illustration degree at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Any material contained in this video may not be manipulated, extracted, reproduced, or distributed without permission. © 2021 Susie Yun